Rebel

Rebel

Rated R

Rated R

Monday, October 21, 2013

A Real American Hero

 
You're a 19 year old kid.
You're critically wounded and dying in
The jungle somewhere in the Central Highlands of Viet Nam .
It's November 11, 1967.
LZ (landing zone) X-ray.
Your unit is outnumbered 8-1 and the enemy fire is so intense from 100 yards away, that your CO (commanding officer) has ordered the MedEvac helicopters to stop coming in.
You're lying there, listening to the enemy machine guns and you know you're not getting out.
Your family is half way around the world, 12,000 miles away, and you'll never see them again.
As the world starts to fade in and out, you know this is the day.
Then - over the machine gun noise - you faintly hear that sound of a helicopter.
You look up to see a Huey coming in. But.. It doesn't seem real because no MedEvac markings are on it.
Captain Ed Freeman is coming in for you.
He's not MedEvac so it's not his job, but he heard the radio call and decided he's flying his Huey down into the machine gun fire anyway.
Even after the MedEvacs were ordered not to come. He's coming anyway.
And he drops it in and sits there in the machine gun fire, as they load 3 of you at a time on board.
Then he flies you up and out through the gunfire to the doctors and nurses and safety.
And, he kept coming back!! 13 more times!!
Until all the wounded were out. No one knew until the mission was over that the Captain had been hit 4 times in the legs and left arm.
He took 29 of you and your buddies out that day. Some would not have made it without the Captain and his Huey.
Medal of Honor Recipient, Captain Ed Freeman, United States Air Force, died last Wednesday at the age of 70, in Boise , Idaho
May God Bless and Rest His Soul.
I bet you didn't hear about this hero's passing, but we've sure seen a whole bunch about Lindsay Lohan, Tiger Woods and the bickering of congress over Health Reform.
Medal of Honor Winner Captain Ed Freeman
Shame on the media !!!
Now... YOU pass this along.
Honor this real hero.

Sunday, October 20, 2013

Piece Of Shit Aunt, More Worried Bout Food Stamps

http://www.break.com/video/check-out-this-scumbag-aunt-s-reaction-to-a-deadly-fire-2529354

Saturday, October 19, 2013

...

Hammer Down!!

People Call Me Crazy, Insane And Borderline Physcotic

After A Long Day On The Farm Kickin Shit On An International Harvester





Photo: Kickin shit n shiftin gears
Cntry Rebel

 

On a side story, my buddy was workin on my pickmeup truck at his shop. They have a  john deere frontloader that has been givin him fits, I asked him if he's learned anything from me... A fellow coworker saw my truck and saw my IH stickers and asked if they were my initials. My buddy then went on to explain that IH is International Harvester, the rival to said  john deere. The guy said he never heard of such.
Just goes to show them city dwellers don't know too much. I told him shoulda told the guy you're drunk go home!

Wednesday, October 16, 2013

Cops: Orange County Man Charged With Murder After Shooting Fugitive Dead

SPARROWBUSH, N.Y. (CBSNewYork) — An Orange County man is behind bars on a murder charge after he allegedly shot a fugitive rape suspect near his family’s home Friday.
As CBS 2′s Lou Young reported exclusively, authorities said David Carlson, a 42-year-old father of three, admitted to killing Norris Acosta-Sanchez with his shotgun when the wanted man emerged from the woods after eluding police in Sparrowbush.
Carlson’s neighbors say everyone in the area was on edge during the police manhunt.
“We were really frightened staying there that night because the guy’s on the loose,” said Amy Mann. “The police lost him.”
Acosta-Sanchez, 35, had reportedly been staying in a vacant cabin near Carlson’s home on Old Plank Road. Police surrounded the cabin Thursday and broke down the door trying to make an arrest, but he wasn’t inside. Police searched the woods all day with heavily armed teams but didn’t find him.
Witness Carmine Ferrera spotted Acosta-Sanchez when Carlson already had his gun pointed at him. Because he’s scheduled to testify before a grand jury, Ferrera declined to provide specifics about what he saw, except to say: “I didn’t see a murder happen. That’s as far as I’m going to go.
“I can tell you the community was in fear. I can tell you Dave wasn’t the only one who armed himself.”
Carlson fired four shots, two of which struck Acosta-Sanchez, police said.
After the shooting, Carlson, a union contractor, gave a long interview to state police and admitted in hindsight he should have called 911, Young reported.
Carlson is charged with second-degree murder. He’s being held in jail on $250,000 bail.
Orange County District Attorney Frank Phillips characterized the incident as “a tragedy all the way around” but is prosecuting Carlson.
****
Theres bound to be more to this story, but I feel the man was justified.

When Im Allowed In The Kitchen

Sunday, October 13, 2013

Million Vets March Tear Down "barrycades", Storm Memorials In D.C


http://cdn2-b.examiner.com/sites/default/files/styles/image_content_width/hash/58/e4/58e4722fc657d20760202bb12f8678bd.jpg?itok=KJRZeu20

October 13, 2013
On Sunday, thousands poured into Washington, D.C., to participate in what was billed as a "Million Vets March" on the memorials closed by the administration as a result of the partial government shutdown prompted by Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid's refusal to consider a single GOP proposal to fund the government.
Protesters quickly tore down the barricades -- known as "barrycades" in honor of Barack Obama -- that surrounded the World War II memorial and discarded them.
Barriers around the Vietnam Memorial and the Lincoln Memorial were just as easily torn down and discarded. At one point, protesters at the Lincoln Memorial could be heard shouting, "USA, USA."
Barricades had to be pulled down a second time at some memorials after Park Police replaced them.
Earlier in the day, former Alaska Governor Sarah Palin joined Sens. Mike Lee, R-Utah, and Ted Cruz, R-Texas, addressed the protesters.
"God Bless each every one of you. This memorial belongs to you," Cruz said.
"This is yours, it belongs to the people, not the government," Lee added.
While speaking at a rally for New Jersey Republican Senate candidate Steve Lonegan on Saturday, Palin railed against the administration, accusing it of “using our military as pawns.”
"And our government thinks they can shut down our memorials that honor our vets?" she said. "For shame."
Predictably, Twitchy noted, liberal hatemongers on Twitter attacked Palin with the usual profane invective.
The march, Breitbart.com said, was organized by Special Operations Speaks.
"Veterans will demand that the Obama administration re-open the memorials and urge Congress to pass legislation to forbid the memorials from being closed in future government shutdowns," Breitbart added.


 Source:

Hey AngryMike your girl is lookin pretty good in that pink shirt and vest ;)


MORE POWER PER SQUARE INCH Part II =)




  Item Number 227R3-45-BSS
  Caliber .45 ACP
  Action Type DA/SA
  Trigger Pull DA 10.0 lbs
  Trigger Pull SA 4.4 lbs
  Overall Length 7.10 in
  Overall Height 5.50 in
  Overall Width 1.50 in
  Barrel Length 3.9 in
  Weight w/Mag 30.5 oz
  Sight Radius 5.7 in
  Mag Capacity 10 Rounds
  Sights SIGLITE® Night Sights
  Grips One-piece polymer
  Frame Finish Black Hard Anodized
  Slide Finish Nitron®
  Accessory Rail Yes
  Features Nitron® finish slide, light-weight alloy carry frame, accessory rail
  MSRP $1,085
  CA Compliant No
  MA Compliant No

Saturday, October 12, 2013

MORE POWER PER SQUARE INCH =)




 The new, remarkably ergonomic SIG P227™. It’s a .45ACP that holds 10+1 rounds — but you’d hardly know it from the thinness of the grip. Take hold of this high-power, high-capacity pistol and you’ll see first-hand how
we’ve stacked the odds in your favor.

- Full-size and carry lengths
- Fits holsters designed for P220R and P226R
- .45 ACP Double stack magazines
- 14 Round extended magazine available
- Double-action/Single-action
- Integral accessory rail

Tree Top Flyer


Circle Of life


Everytime

Guilty Look

Friday, October 11, 2013

Wednesday, October 9, 2013

So Much Irony

Hey MissK Hows The View?

Run That Shine


Little Music To Get You Through The Week


Want the facts concerning the proposed change to Ohio's ‘duty to retreat'? Don't look to the media or opponents of HB 203.

by Chad D. Baus
In the lead-up to the return of the Ohio General Assembly from their summer break and the opening of hearings on several pro-gun rights bills, certain individuals and groups, along with their media accomplices, have ramped up their efforts to paint one particular provision in Rep. Terry Johnson's House Bill 203 as a "Stand Your Ground" bill. These groups, which have always opposed Second Amendment rights, think they might have finally stumbled on a way to stop what has for them become loss after loss after loss as Ohio has slowly worked to restore gun rights over the past decade.
Despite their loss in a Florida court room, these groups believe they may have achieved one victory in Zimmerman-Martin media saga: re-branding so-called "Stand Your Ground" laws as racist. It is now apparent that these groups are seeking to export this tactic to other states, including Ohio.
HB 203 seeks to make many improvements, but the one change that has these anti-gun rights advocates the most incensed is the removal of the legal "duty to retreat" before using lethal force to defend against a life-threatening attack. According to the individuals getting so much attention recently in the Ohio media, the following legislative change would make Ohio into a racist "shoot first" state:
Sec. 2901.09 (B) For purposes of any section of the Revised Code that sets forth a criminal offense, a person who lawfully is in that person's residence has no duty to retreat before using force in self-defense, defense of another, or defense of that person's residence, and a person who lawfully is an occupant of that person's vehicle or who lawfully is an occupant in a vehicle owned by an immediate family member of the person has no duty to retreat before using force in self-defense or defense of another if that person is in a place that the person lawfully has a right to be.
Rest of the story here: http://www.buckeyefirearms.org/node/9139

Blow Your Mind


Sunday, October 6, 2013

Just Shows Democrats Are Worthless



First of candy is a bitch that doesn't get it. Second Ted Cruz has reason. Other politicians are only bashing him because he knows his shit! He is a man of reason for the American people. The democrats are focused on one thing and that one thing is destroying America at its core...
The demorats just need to remember they can only fool so many and there are more out there that know the truth. Next year is election year and there asses are on notice! 
The republicans were passing no nonsense bills to get people paid. Its the demorats that shut the government down and refused to pay people over something that isn't even mentioned in 8 bills sitting on reids desk. 
So whos the asshole now?

Farmers Have The Biggest Hearts


Friday, October 4, 2013

Be On The Look Out

One of my buddies got robbed and got her 20 GA Remington 870 wood stock swiped along with her HKP30 9mm. It happened around LaGrange/Wellington area. She has serial numbers and has been reported stolen.

Fuck Em!

You Tell Em George!

Been One Of Them Months...

Thursday, October 3, 2013

Timing Is Everything

Obamacare Can Be Defunded Without Senate Approval


October 2, 2013
When the House passed legislation to defund ObamaCare but would keep the government running through mid-December, the Senate, led by Senate Majority Leader, Senator Harry Reid (D-NV) stated that they would not budge on Obamacare and the legislation was defeated.
On Monday, Dr. Harold Pease, an expert on the United States Constitution, stated that the authority in dealing with Obamacare funding belongs to the U.S. House, not the U.S. Senate and that the House is doing this all wrong.
Pease said, “Everything hinged upon funding which was given exclusively to the House of Representatives, the only power that they alone had.”
Pease went on to say, “All bills for raising revenue shall originate in the House of Representatives; but the Senate may propose or concur with Amendments as on other Bills. To fund anything, in this case Obamacare, first approval is required by the House of Representatives.”
“If that does not happen taxpayer money cannot be spent. The people, through their representatives to Congress, have determined, after a three-year closer scrutiny of The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (Obamacare), that it does not protect the patient, is not affordable and is not even workable; hence in the interests of the vast majority of the people needs to be defunded.”
When the United States Supreme Court ruled on Obamacare in 2012, Chief Justice Roberts stance on Obamacare coincides with the intent of the U.S. Constitution, explained by Pease, and the powers between the House and Senate.
According to the U.S. Supreme Court ruling, Obamacare cannot be implemented and is not considered the law of the land, contrary to Democrat claims.
Bubba Atkinson of the Independent Journal Review wrote, “Chief Justice Roberts actually ruled the mandate, relative to the commerce clause, was unconstitutional. That is how the Democrats got Obama-care going in the first place. This is critical. His ruling means Congress can’t compel American citizens to purchase anything, ever. The notion is now officially and forever, unconstitutional. As it should be.”
“Next, he stated that, because Congress doesn’t have the ability to mandate, it must, to fund Obama-care, rely on its power to tax. Therefore, the mechanism that funds Obama-care is a tax,” said Atkinson. “He struck down as unconstitutional, the Obama-care idea that the federal government can bully states into complying by yanking their existing medicaid funding. Liberals, through Obama-care, basically said to the states — “comply with Obama-care or we will stop existing funding.” Roberts ruled that is a no-no.”
When the House attached Obamacare to the legislation in funding the government, it made a mistake in doing so and the funding of Obamacare should have been separate, thereby giving the Senate no power in denying the Houses’ request to defund Obamacare.
Pease said, “House opposition to funding Obamacare would have been far more powerful if made a “stand alone” bill not attached to general funding, but it is not. “Stand alone,” having no other parts, would have left the Senate no wiggle or compromise room once it went to them, nor would there be for the Joint Conference Committee thereafter that reconciles any differences between the two houses. There would be nothing to reconcile, Obamacare is merely defunded.”
“Still, the intent of the Founding Fathers was to give the people, through their House of Representatives, the power collectively to say no to any proposed federal tax, which she is decidedly doing.”
If Obamacare is removed from the government budget, presented, and voted on as a separate bill, Obamacare can be defunded by the House. If that is the case, then the Senate and the President has no constitutional authority to override the House's decision.

 Source:

 So in all of this I see that the House was partially right, if they had only been a separate bill to not fund obamacare then it would basically be null and void and the democrats would look like an ass once more...



Wednesday, October 2, 2013

Its Bout That Time... Again.

So here we are our government has been shut down. Our WWII Vets can't see the monument dedicated to them and their fellow fallen comrades. Last I checked they were public monuments and obama hired guards to keep people out. If anything open them up and post the guards around the monuments so no sorry sumbitch defaces them. The stock market is falling. Politicians are blaming each other, well mainly just the democrats. With harry reid head lining that offense. Oh and don't forget that kerry signed a UN gun ban treaty a few days ago... look for a back door sweep there.

So I come to the conclusion to bring the rifles out of the closet, give them a thorough goin through and oil them up and count the munitions. We The People can't and won't take much more. And if shit keeps goin this way this country may very well see another revolution. Its been a long time coming, but if you look back in history, its coming around. Some of my quick math; mine, not yours, not some book head, mine so you can take it with a grain of salt or accept it or figure it out yourself; we really ain't do for a major war til 2030. just about every 80 years America is involved in a major conflict.

So be ready, be prepared and soldier on! 

143-Year-Old Law Has Washington Treading Gingerly During Shutdown

Administration officials now live in fear of a 19th-century law that could get them fired, penalized or even imprisoned if they make the wrong choices while the government is shut down.
The law is the Antideficiency Act, passed by Congress in 1870 (and amended several times), which prohibits the government from incurring any monetary obligation for which Congress has not appropriated funds.
In shutting down the government, most memos cite the law as the reason. The Government Accountability Office says employees who violate the Antideficiency Act may be subject to disciplinary action, suspension and even "fines, imprisonment, or both."
CNBC has learned that in several executive branch departments, high-level staff members review individual decisions about what government activities to allow for fear of running afoul of the Antideficiency Act. One White House official said he has advised his employees not to check their email or cellphones. Under the act, even volunteering for government service is expressly prohibited.
In a memo to his department employees today, Treasury Secretary Jack Lew cited the law as the reason for reduced staffing.
"For the duration of this impasse, as required by the Antideficiency Act and directed by OMB, the Department will be required to operate with only the minimal staffing level necessary to execute only certain legally exempted activities," Lew wrote.
The only exemptions to the shutdown concern "emergencies involving the safety of human life or the protection of property," according to government documents. That has meant airports and the Postal Service are open, Social Security checks get paid and federal prisons and courts will operate as normal as do most national security functions including the military and the Central Intelligence Agency. But national parks and museums are closed along with big parts of the departments of Education and Commerce
Congress passed the law as part of a struggle—dating back to the nation's founding—for control over the power of the purse. Some presidents, such as Abraham Lincoln during the Civil War, would incur obligations for which Congress had to appropriate funds after the fact.
What is ironic is that Congress in shutting down the government has to at least to some extent given up the power of the purse to the executive branch. Under the broad guidelines of what constitutes an emergency or threat to life or property, OMB now more or less decides what gets funded and what doesn't. But that latitude is limited by the fear of officials that, sometime after the event, a given decision is found to have been in violation of the Antideficiency Act.


Source:

Holy Freakin Crap Theres A Moose In The Front Yard

Well Harry Reid Ain't Doin Anything Productive

Veterans Pass Barriers at Closed WWII Memorial

Dozens of veterans barricaded outside the closed World War II Memorial because of the government shutdown were escorted past the barriers Tuesday by members of Congress so they could see the monument.
More than 125 veterans from Mississippi and Iowa arrived for a previously scheduled visit to the memorial Tuesday morning to find it barricaded by the National Park Service. Several members of Congress escorted them inside after cutting police tape and moving barriers that blocked the memorial.
John Kleinschmidt, 87, of Ames, Iowa, said the barriers were opened just enough for his group to walk through freely by the time he arrived. Kleinschmidt trained as a flight engineer during World War II but was never deployed abroad.
"It's unfortunate that this is what happens when they know that there are busloads of veterans coming down here, and they don't have the good sense to say keep the damn thing open," he said. "These are the guys that created it."
The Honor Flight Network brings groups of World War II veterans from across the country for free to visit the memorial built in their honor on an almost daily basis.
Wayne Lennep, a volunteer with the Mississippi Coast Guard Honor Flight group, said the trip had been planned for months for a group of 91 veterans as well as family members and escorts. Their chartered plane left Gulfport, Miss., on Tuesday morning.
The veterans were met at the memorial by Sen. Roger Wicker and Reps. Steven Palazzo, Alan Nunnelee and Gregg Harper, all Mississippi Republicans. Other lawmakers joined as well. Lennep said Wicker and Palazzo have met the veterans on previous trips.
Palazzo told the Mississippi Press of Pascagoula that he moved the barricades.
"We cannot deprive our veterans of coming here," Palazzo said of moving the barricades. "This is their day.
Rep. Michele Bachmann was out walking in her shorts and long-sleeved t-shirt when she got a panicked email from another member of Congress, she said. She came to the memorial and began taking pictures. Another lawmaker cut the tape, and the lawmakers escorted the veterans in, Bachmann said. Several lawmakers plan to continue coming to the memorial to ensure veterans can visit, she said.
"I couldn't believe my eyes," Bachmann said. "It was big buses and a narrow strip of sidewalk, and there were all these veterans standing here behind police tape and they're prevented from going in to see the memorial."
Lennep said blocking off the memorial seemed excessive.
"I don't really understand why they would have barricaded veterans out of their own memorial anyway," he said. "If there are people there guarding it to keep people out, they could watch people as they visit."
National Park Service spokeswoman Carol Johnson said park rangers enjoy greeting the veterans. The memorial was closed, she said, because of an order to close all park service grounds to protect the sites and keep visitors safe while more than 300 workers are furloughed.
"This is not something the park service wanted to do. We'd like to get back to work," Johnson said.
Charles Ricketts, a veteran from Ames, Iowa, blamed Congress, not the National Park Service, for nearly ruining his group's trip.
"I'm not impressed with Congress' ability or the president," he said. "They're not showing us much leadership and judgment. It's all political."
———
 This is probably the best time to go see the monuments in DC. Id like to see obama try to stop them Vets!
Bless em all!!
Korean War veteran Frederick Jenkins, from Iowa, third from left, poses for a photograph at National World War II Memorial in Washington Tuesday. Veterans who had traveled from across the country were allowed to visit the National World War II Memorial after it had been officially closed. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
WASHINGTON — Dozens of veterans barricaded outside the closed World War II Memorial because of the government shutdown were escorted past the barriers Tuesday by members of Congress so they could see the monument.
More than 125 veterans from Mississippi and Iowa arrived for a previously scheduled visit to the memorial Tuesday morning to find it barricaded by the National Park Service. Several members of Congress escorted them inside after cutting police tape and moving barriers that blocked the memorial.
John Kleinschmidt, 87, of Ames, Iowa, said the barriers were opened just enough for his group to walk through freely by the time he arrived. Kleinschmidt trained as a flight engineer during World War II but was never deployed abroad.
“It’s unfortunate that this is what happens when they know that there are busloads of veterans coming down here, and they don’t have the good sense to say keep the damn thing open,” he said. “These are the guys that created it.”
The Honor Flight Network brings groups of World War II veterans from across the country for free to visit the memorial built in their honor on an almost daily basis.
Wayne Lennep, a volunteer with the Mississippi Coast Guard Honor Flight group, said the trip had been planned for months for a group of 91 veterans as well as family members and escorts. Their chartered plane left Gulfport, Miss., on Tuesday morning.
The veterans were met at the memorial by Sen. Roger Wicker and Reps. Steven Palazzo, Alan Nunnelee and Gregg Harper, all Mississippi Republicans. Other lawmakers joined as well. Lennep said Wicker and Palazzo have met the veterans on previous trips.
Palazzo told the Mississippi Press of Pascagoula that he moved the barricades.
“We cannot deprive our veterans of coming here,” Palazzo said of moving the barricades. “This is their day.
Rep. Michele Bachmann was out walking in her shorts and long-sleeved t-shirt when she got a panicked email from another member of Congress, she said. She came to the memorial and began taking pictures. Another lawmaker cut the tape, and the lawmakers escorted the veterans in, Bachmann said. Several lawmakers plan to continue coming to the memorial to ensure veterans can visit, she said.
“I couldn’t believe my eyes,” Bachmann said. “It was big buses and a narrow strip of sidewalk, and there were all these veterans standing here behind police tape and they’re prevented from going in to see the memorial.”
Lennep said blocking off the memorial seemed excessive.
“I don’t really understand why they would have barricaded veterans out of their own memorial anyway,” he said. “If there are people there guarding it to keep people out, they could watch people as they visit.”
National Park Service spokeswoman Carol Johnson said park rangers enjoy greeting theveterans. The memorial was closed, she said, because of an order to close all park service grounds to protect the sites and keep visitors safe while more than 300 workers are furloughed.
“This is not something the park service wanted to do. We’d like to get back to work,” Johnson said.
Charles Ricketts, a veteran from Ames, Iowa, blamed Congress, not the National Park Service, for nearly ruining his group’s trip.
“I’m not impressed with Congress’ ability or the president,” he said. “They’re not showing us much leadership and judgment. It’s all political.”
- See more at: http://chronicle.northcoastnow.com/2013/10/01/veterans-pass-barriers-at-closed-wwii-memorial/#sthash.2tK9KzoQ.dpuf
Dozens of veterans barricaded outside the closed World War II Memorial because of the government shutdown were escorted past the barriers Tuesday by members of Congress so they could see the monument.
More than 125 veterans from Mississippi and Iowa arrived for a previously scheduled visit to the memorial Tuesday morning to find it barricaded by the National Park Service. Several members of Congress escorted them inside after cutting police tape and moving barriers that blocked the memorial.
John Kleinschmidt, 87, of Ames, Iowa, said the barriers were opened just enough for his group to walk through freely by the time he arrived. Kleinschmidt trained as a flight engineer during World War II but was never deployed abroad.
"It's unfortunate that this is what happens when they know that there are busloads of veterans coming down here, and they don't have the good sense to say keep the damn thing open," he said. "These are the guys that created it."
The Honor Flight Network brings groups of World War II veterans from across the country for free to visit the memorial built in their honor on an almost daily basis.
Wayne Lennep, a volunteer with the Mississippi Coast Guard Honor Flight group, said the trip had been planned for months for a group of 91 veterans as well as family members and escorts. Their chartered plane left Gulfport, Miss., on Tuesday morning.
The veterans were met at the memorial by Sen. Roger Wicker and Reps. Steven Palazzo, Alan Nunnelee and Gregg Harper, all Mississippi Republicans. Other lawmakers joined as well. Lennep said Wicker and Palazzo have met the veterans on previous trips.
Palazzo told the Mississippi Press of Pascagoula that he moved the barricades.
"We cannot deprive our veterans of coming here," Palazzo said of moving the barricades. "This is their day.
Rep. Michele Bachmann was out walking in her shorts and long-sleeved t-shirt when she got a panicked email from another member of Congress, she said. She came to the memorial and began taking pictures. Another lawmaker cut the tape, and the lawmakers escorted the veterans in, Bachmann said. Several lawmakers plan to continue coming to the memorial to ensure veterans can visit, she said.
"I couldn't believe my eyes," Bachmann said. "It was big buses and a narrow strip of sidewalk, and there were all these veterans standing here behind police tape and they're prevented from going in to see the memorial."
Lennep said blocking off the memorial seemed excessive.
"I don't really understand why they would have barricaded veterans out of their own memorial anyway," he said. "If there are people there guarding it to keep people out, they could watch people as they visit."
National Park Service spokeswoman Carol Johnson said park rangers enjoy greeting the veterans. The memorial was closed, she said, because of an order to close all park service grounds to protect the sites and keep visitors safe while more than 300 workers are furloughed.
"This is not something the park service wanted to do. We'd like to get back to work," Johnson said.
Charles Ricketts, a veteran from Ames, Iowa, blamed Congress, not the National Park Service, for nearly ruining his group's trip.
"I'm not impressed with Congress' ability or the president," he said. "They're not showing us much leadership and judgment. It's all political."
———
Dozens of veterans barricaded outside the closed World War II Memorial because of the government shutdown were escorted past the barriers Tuesday by members of Congress so they could see the monument.
More than 125 veterans from Mississippi and Iowa arrived for a previously scheduled visit to the memorial Tuesday morning to find it barricaded by the National Park Service. Several members of Congress escorted them inside after cutting police tape and moving barriers that blocked the memorial.
John Kleinschmidt, 87, of Ames, Iowa, said the barriers were opened just enough for his group to walk through freely by the time he arrived. Kleinschmidt trained as a flight engineer during World War II but was never deployed abroad.
"It's unfortunate that this is what happens when they know that there are busloads of veterans coming down here, and they don't have the good sense to say keep the damn thing open," he said. "These are the guys that created it."
The Honor Flight Network brings groups of World War II veterans from across the country for free to visit the memorial built in their honor on an almost daily basis.
Wayne Lennep, a volunteer with the Mississippi Coast Guard Honor Flight group, said the trip had been planned for months for a group of 91 veterans as well as family members and escorts. Their chartered plane left Gulfport, Miss., on Tuesday morning.
The veterans were met at the memorial by Sen. Roger Wicker and Reps. Steven Palazzo, Alan Nunnelee and Gregg Harper, all Mississippi Republicans. Other lawmakers joined as well. Lennep said Wicker and Palazzo have met the veterans on previous trips.
Palazzo told the Mississippi Press of Pascagoula that he moved the barricades.
"We cannot deprive our veterans of coming here," Palazzo said of moving the barricades. "This is their day.
Rep. Michele Bachmann was out walking in her shorts and long-sleeved t-shirt when she got a panicked email from another member of Congress, she said. She came to the memorial and began taking pictures. Another lawmaker cut the tape, and the lawmakers escorted the veterans in, Bachmann said. Several lawmakers plan to continue coming to the memorial to ensure veterans can visit, she said.
"I couldn't believe my eyes," Bachmann said. "It was big buses and a narrow strip of sidewalk, and there were all these veterans standing here behind police tape and they're prevented from going in to see the memorial."
Lennep said blocking off the memorial seemed excessive.
"I don't really understand why they would have barricaded veterans out of their own memorial anyway," he said. "If there are people there guarding it to keep people out, they could watch people as they visit."
National Park Service spokeswoman Carol Johnson said park rangers enjoy greeting the veterans. The memorial was closed, she said, because of an order to close all park service grounds to protect the sites and keep visitors safe while more than 300 workers are furloughed.
"This is not something the park service wanted to do. We'd like to get back to work," Johnson said.
Charles Ricketts, a veteran from Ames, Iowa, blamed Congress, not the National Park Service, for nearly ruining his group's trip.
"I'm not impressed with Congress' ability or the president," he said. "They're not showing us much leadership and judgment. It's all political."
———
Korean War veteran Frederick Jenkins, from Iowa, third from left, poses for a photograph at National World War II Memorial in Washington Tuesday. Veterans who had traveled from across the country were allowed to visit the National World War II Memorial after it had been officially closed. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
WASHINGTON — Dozens of veterans barricaded outside the closed World War II Memorial because of the government shutdown were escorted past the barriers Tuesday by members of Congress so they could see the monument.
More than 125 veterans from Mississippi and Iowa arrived for a previously scheduled visit to the memorial Tuesday morning to find it barricaded by the National Park Service. Several members of Congress escorted them inside after cutting police tape and moving barriers that blocked the memorial.
John Kleinschmidt, 87, of Ames, Iowa, said the barriers were opened just enough for his group to walk through freely by the time he arrived. Kleinschmidt trained as a flight engineer during World War II but was never deployed abroad.
“It’s unfortunate that this is what happens when they know that there are busloads of veterans coming down here, and they don’t have the good sense to say keep the damn thing open,” he said. “These are the guys that created it.”
The Honor Flight Network brings groups of World War II veterans from across the country for free to visit the memorial built in their honor on an almost daily basis.
Wayne Lennep, a volunteer with the Mississippi Coast Guard Honor Flight group, said the trip had been planned for months for a group of 91 veterans as well as family members and escorts. Their chartered plane left Gulfport, Miss., on Tuesday morning.
The veterans were met at the memorial by Sen. Roger Wicker and Reps. Steven Palazzo, Alan Nunnelee and Gregg Harper, all Mississippi Republicans. Other lawmakers joined as well. Lennep said Wicker and Palazzo have met the veterans on previous trips.
Palazzo told the Mississippi Press of Pascagoula that he moved the barricades.
“We cannot deprive our veterans of coming here,” Palazzo said of moving the barricades. “This is their day.
Rep. Michele Bachmann was out walking in her shorts and long-sleeved t-shirt when she got a panicked email from another member of Congress, she said. She came to the memorial and began taking pictures. Another lawmaker cut the tape, and the lawmakers escorted the veterans in, Bachmann said. Several lawmakers plan to continue coming to the memorial to ensure veterans can visit, she said.
“I couldn’t believe my eyes,” Bachmann said. “It was big buses and a narrow strip of sidewalk, and there were all these veterans standing here behind police tape and they’re prevented from going in to see the memorial.”
Lennep said blocking off the memorial seemed excessive.
“I don’t really understand why they would have barricaded veterans out of their own memorial anyway,” he said. “If there are people there guarding it to keep people out, they could watch people as they visit.”
National Park Service spokeswoman Carol Johnson said park rangers enjoy greeting theveterans. The memorial was closed, she said, because of an order to close all park service grounds to protect the sites and keep visitors safe while more than 300 workers are furloughed.
“This is not something the park service wanted to do. We’d like to get back to work,” Johnson said.
Charles Ricketts, a veteran from Ames, Iowa, blamed Congress, not the National Park Service, for nearly ruining his group’s trip.
“I’m not impressed with Congress’ ability or the president,” he said. “They’re not showing us much leadership and judgment. It’s all political.”
- See more at: http://chronicle.northcoastnow.com/2013/10/01/veterans-pass-barriers-at-closed-wwii-memorial/#sthash.2tK9KzoQ.dpuf
Korean War veteran Frederick Jenkins, from Iowa, third from left, poses for a photograph at National World War II Memorial in Washington Tuesday. Veterans who had traveled from across the country were allowed to visit the National World War II Memorial after it had been officially closed. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
WASHINGTON — Dozens of veterans barricaded outside the closed World War II Memorial because of the government shutdown were escorted past the barriers Tuesday by members of Congress so they could see the monument.
More than 125 veterans from Mississippi and Iowa arrived for a previously scheduled visit to the memorial Tuesday morning to find it barricaded by the National Park Service. Several members of Congress escorted them inside after cutting police tape and moving barriers that blocked the memorial.
John Kleinschmidt, 87, of Ames, Iowa, said the barriers were opened just enough for his group to walk through freely by the time he arrived. Kleinschmidt trained as a flight engineer during World War II but was never deployed abroad.
“It’s unfortunate that this is what happens when they know that there are busloads of veterans coming down here, and they don’t have the good sense to say keep the damn thing open,” he said. “These are the guys that created it.”
The Honor Flight Network brings groups of World War II veterans from across the country for free to visit the memorial built in their honor on an almost daily basis.
Wayne Lennep, a volunteer with the Mississippi Coast Guard Honor Flight group, said the trip had been planned for months for a group of 91 veterans as well as family members and escorts. Their chartered plane left Gulfport, Miss., on Tuesday morning.
The veterans were met at the memorial by Sen. Roger Wicker and Reps. Steven Palazzo, Alan Nunnelee and Gregg Harper, all Mississippi Republicans. Other lawmakers joined as well. Lennep said Wicker and Palazzo have met the veterans on previous trips.
Palazzo told the Mississippi Press of Pascagoula that he moved the barricades.
“We cannot deprive our veterans of coming here,” Palazzo said of moving the barricades. “This is their day.
Rep. Michele Bachmann was out walking in her shorts and long-sleeved t-shirt when she got a panicked email from another member of Congress, she said. She came to the memorial and began taking pictures. Another lawmaker cut the tape, and the lawmakers escorted the veterans in, Bachmann said. Several lawmakers plan to continue coming to the memorial to ensure veterans can visit, she said.
“I couldn’t believe my eyes,” Bachmann said. “It was big buses and a narrow strip of sidewalk, and there were all these veterans standing here behind police tape and they’re prevented from going in to see the memorial.”
Lennep said blocking off the memorial seemed excessive.
“I don’t really understand why they would have barricaded veterans out of their own memorial anyway,” he said. “If there are people there guarding it to keep people out, they could watch people as they visit.”
National Park Service spokeswoman Carol Johnson said park rangers enjoy greeting theveterans. The memorial was closed, she said, because of an order to close all park service grounds to protect the sites and keep visitors safe while more than 300 workers are furloughed.
“This is not something the park service wanted to do. We’d like to get back to work,” Johnson said.
Charles Ricketts, a veteran from Ames, Iowa, blamed Congress, not the National Park Service, for nearly ruining his group’s trip.
“I’m not impressed with Congress’ ability or the president,” he said. “They’re not showing us much leadership and judgment. It’s all political.”
- See more at: http://chronicle.northcoastnow.com/2013/10/01/veterans-pass-barriers-at-closed-wwii-memorial/#sthash.2tK9KzoQ.dpuf
Korean War veteran Frederick Jenkins, from Iowa, third from left, poses for a photograph at National World War II Memorial in Washington Tuesday. Veterans who had traveled from across the country were allowed to visit the National World War II Memorial after it had been officially closed. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
WASHINGTON — Dozens of veterans barricaded outside the closed World War II Memorial because of the government shutdown were escorted past the barriers Tuesday by members of Congress so they could see the monument.
More than 125 veterans from Mississippi and Iowa arrived for a previously scheduled visit to the memorial Tuesday morning to find it barricaded by the National Park Service. Several members of Congress escorted them inside after cutting police tape and moving barriers that blocked the memorial.
John Kleinschmidt, 87, of Ames, Iowa, said the barriers were opened just enough for his group to walk through freely by the time he arrived. Kleinschmidt trained as a flight engineer during World War II but was never deployed abroad.
“It’s unfortunate that this is what happens when they know that there are busloads of veterans coming down here, and they don’t have the good sense to say keep the damn thing open,” he said. “These are the guys that created it.”
The Honor Flight Network brings groups of World War II veterans from across the country for free to visit the memorial built in their honor on an almost daily basis.
Wayne Lennep, a volunteer with the Mississippi Coast Guard Honor Flight group, said the trip had been planned for months for a group of 91 veterans as well as family members and escorts. Their chartered plane left Gulfport, Miss., on Tuesday morning.
The veterans were met at the memorial by Sen. Roger Wicker and Reps. Steven Palazzo, Alan Nunnelee and Gregg Harper, all Mississippi Republicans. Other lawmakers joined as well. Lennep said Wicker and Palazzo have met the veterans on previous trips.
Palazzo told the Mississippi Press of Pascagoula that he moved the barricades.
“We cannot deprive our veterans of coming here,” Palazzo said of moving the barricades. “This is their day.
Rep. Michele Bachmann was out walking in her shorts and long-sleeved t-shirt when she got a panicked email from another member of Congress, she said. She came to the memorial and began taking pictures. Another lawmaker cut the tape, and the lawmakers escorted the veterans in, Bachmann said. Several lawmakers plan to continue coming to the memorial to ensure veterans can visit, she said.
“I couldn’t believe my eyes,” Bachmann said. “It was big buses and a narrow strip of sidewalk, and there were all these veterans standing here behind police tape and they’re prevented from going in to see the memorial.”
Lennep said blocking off the memorial seemed excessive.
“I don’t really understand why they would have barricaded veterans out of their own memorial anyway,” he said. “If there are people there guarding it to keep people out, they could watch people as they visit.”
National Park Service spokeswoman Carol Johnson said park rangers enjoy greeting theveterans. The memorial was closed, she said, because of an order to close all park service grounds to protect the sites and keep visitors safe while more than 300 workers are furloughed.
“This is not something the park service wanted to do. We’d like to get back to work,” Johnson said.
Charles Ricketts, a veteran from Ames, Iowa, blamed Congress, not the National Park Service, for nearly ruining his group’s trip.
“I’m not impressed with Congress’ ability or the president,” he said. “They’re not showing us much leadership and judgment. It’s all political.”
- See more at: http://chronicle.northcoastnow.com/2013/10/01/veterans-pass-barriers-at-closed-wwii-memorial/#sthash.2tK9KzoQ.dpuf
Korean War veteran Frederick Jenkins, from Iowa, third from left, poses for a photograph at National World War II Memorial in Washington Tuesday. Veterans who had traveled from across the country were allowed to visit the National World War II Memorial after it had been officially closed. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
WASHINGTON — Dozens of veterans barricaded outside the closed World War II Memorial because of the government shutdown were escorted past the barriers Tuesday by members of Congress so they could see the monument.
More than 125 veterans from Mississippi and Iowa arrived for a previously scheduled visit to the memorial Tuesday morning to find it barricaded by the National Park Service. Several members of Congress escorted them inside after cutting police tape and moving barriers that blocked the memorial.
John Kleinschmidt, 87, of Ames, Iowa, said the barriers were opened just enough for his group to walk through freely by the time he arrived. Kleinschmidt trained as a flight engineer during World War II but was never deployed abroad.
“It’s unfortunate that this is what happens when they know that there are busloads of veterans coming down here, and they don’t have the good sense to say keep the damn thing open,” he said. “These are the guys that created it.”
The Honor Flight Network brings groups of World War II veterans from across the country for free to visit the memorial built in their honor on an almost daily basis.
Wayne Lennep, a volunteer with the Mississippi Coast Guard Honor Flight group, said the trip had been planned for months for a group of 91 veterans as well as family members and escorts. Their chartered plane left Gulfport, Miss., on Tuesday morning.
The veterans were met at the memorial by Sen. Roger Wicker and Reps. Steven Palazzo, Alan Nunnelee and Gregg Harper, all Mississippi Republicans. Other lawmakers joined as well. Lennep said Wicker and Palazzo have met the veterans on previous trips.
Palazzo told the Mississippi Press of Pascagoula that he moved the barricades.
“We cannot deprive our veterans of coming here,” Palazzo said of moving the barricades. “This is their day.
Rep. Michele Bachmann was out walking in her shorts and long-sleeved t-shirt when she got a panicked email from another member of Congress, she said. She came to the memorial and began taking pictures. Another lawmaker cut the tape, and the lawmakers escorted the veterans in, Bachmann said. Several lawmakers plan to continue coming to the memorial to ensure veterans can visit, she said.
“I couldn’t believe my eyes,” Bachmann said. “It was big buses and a narrow strip of sidewalk, and there were all these veterans standing here behind police tape and they’re prevented from going in to see the memorial.”
Lennep said blocking off the memorial seemed excessive.
“I don’t really understand why they would have barricaded veterans out of their own memorial anyway,” he said. “If there are people there guarding it to keep people out, they could watch people as they visit.”
National Park Service spokeswoman Carol Johnson said park rangers enjoy greeting theveterans. The memorial was closed, she said, because of an order to close all park service grounds to protect the sites and keep visitors safe while more than 300 workers are furloughed.
“This is not something the park service wanted to do. We’d like to get back to work,” Johnson said.
Charles Ricketts, a veteran from Ames, Iowa, blamed Congress, not the National Park Service, for nearly ruining his group’s trip.
“I’m not impressed with Congress’ ability or the president,” he said. “They’re not showing us much leadership and judgment. It’s all political.”
- See more at: http://chronicle.northcoastnow.com/2013/10/01/veterans-pass-barriers-at-closed-wwii-memorial/#sthash.2tK9KzoQ.dpuf
Korean War veteran Frederick Jenkins, from Iowa, third from left, poses for a photograph at National World War II Memorial in Washington Tuesday. Veterans who had traveled from across the country were allowed to visit the National World War II Memorial after it had been officially closed. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
WASHINGTON — Dozens of veterans barricaded outside the closed World War II Memorial because of the government shutdown were escorted past the barriers Tuesday by members of Congress so they could see the monument.
More than 125 veterans from Mississippi and Iowa arrived for a previously scheduled visit to the memorial Tuesday morning to find it barricaded by the National Park Service. Several members of Congress escorted them inside after cutting police tape and moving barriers that blocked the memorial.
John Kleinschmidt, 87, of Ames, Iowa, said the barriers were opened just enough for his group to walk through freely by the time he arrived. Kleinschmidt trained as a flight engineer during World War II but was never deployed abroad.
“It’s unfortunate that this is what happens when they know that there are busloads of veterans coming down here, and they don’t have the good sense to say keep the damn thing open,” he said. “These are the guys that created it.”
The Honor Flight Network brings groups of World War II veterans from across the country for free to visit the memorial built in their honor on an almost daily basis.
Wayne Lennep, a volunteer with the Mississippi Coast Guard Honor Flight group, said the trip had been planned for months for a group of 91 veterans as well as family members and escorts. Their chartered plane left Gulfport, Miss., on Tuesday morning.
The veterans were met at the memorial by Sen. Roger Wicker and Reps. Steven Palazzo, Alan Nunnelee and Gregg Harper, all Mississippi Republicans. Other lawmakers joined as well. Lennep said Wicker and Palazzo have met the veterans on previous trips.
Palazzo told the Mississippi Press of Pascagoula that he moved the barricades.
“We cannot deprive our veterans of coming here,” Palazzo said of moving the barricades. “This is their day.
Rep. Michele Bachmann was out walking in her shorts and long-sleeved t-shirt when she got a panicked email from another member of Congress, she said. She came to the memorial and began taking pictures. Another lawmaker cut the tape, and the lawmakers escorted the veterans in, Bachmann said. Several lawmakers plan to continue coming to the memorial to ensure veterans can visit, she said.
“I couldn’t believe my eyes,” Bachmann said. “It was big buses and a narrow strip of sidewalk, and there were all these veterans standing here behind police tape and they’re prevented from going in to see the memorial.”
Lennep said blocking off the memorial seemed excessive.
“I don’t really understand why they would have barricaded veterans out of their own memorial anyway,” he said. “If there are people there guarding it to keep people out, they could watch people as they visit.”
National Park Service spokeswoman Carol Johnson said park rangers enjoy greeting theveterans. The memorial was closed, she said, because of an order to close all park service grounds to protect the sites and keep visitors safe while more than 300 workers are furloughed.
“This is not something the park service wanted to do. We’d like to get back to work,” Johnson said.
Charles Ricketts, a veteran from Ames, Iowa, blamed Congress, not the National Park Service, for nearly ruining his group’s trip.
“I’m not impressed with Congress’ ability or the president,” he said. “They’re not showing us much leadership and judgment. It’s all political.”
- See more at: http://chronicle.northcoastnow.com/2013/10/01/veterans-pass-barriers-at-closed-wwii-memorial/#sthash.2tK9KzoQ.dpuf

I Don't That Will Work, But You Can Try...